The Big Lakes County Agriculture department offers a variety of services and programs that benefit our rural residents. The Agricultural Fieldman has a legislated responsibility for weed and pest control, water and soil conservation, to assist the province under the Animal Health Act, and to promote agricultural economic development.

 

The Agriculture department also provides identification and information services on weed, pest, and insect control and offers an array of programs, information, advice, and education to the agricultural industry and the Agricultural Advisory Committee.

Yearly, Big Lakes County controls vegetation along roadsides, right-of-ways and within County hamlets. There are a variety of ways in which this control is achieved; through mowing, brushing, herbicide application and working with the public.

 

Controlling vegetation within these areas is a responsibility for the County and addresses concerns regarding visibility, unsightliness as well as adherence to the Weed Control Act of Alberta.

 

The Act aims to protect citizens from the economic, social and environmental impacts of invasive plants. Invasive plants outcompete native vegetation, taking over areas through superior root, shoot and seed production. This can lead to yield losses for our Agricultural Producers, lower water quality in our lakes and rivers, and a loss to our natural landscapes aesthetic and biodiversity.

 

Under the Act, there are two designations. Prohibited Noxious plants are ones that are in the province in low numbers or not yet recorded. Plants under this designation must be destroyed. This includes the entire plant, down to the root structure and the seed.

 

Noxious plants are plants that are established in the Province of Alberta. These plants are designated to be controlled. This means controlling seed and vegetative reproduction.

 

Big Lakes County utilizes an Integrated Pest Management system. This involves:

  • Monitoring– Tracking infestations through the use of GPS and inspections
  • Cultural Control– Sanitation, roadside seeding, and biological control
  • Mechanical Control– Mowing, pruning, and brushing
  • Chemical Control– Herbicide Application

 

Big Lakes County has a yearly Herbicide Application program aimed at reducing chemical usage and providing optimal vegetative control. Herbicides are carefully selected, weighing the potential residual impacts, the chemicals effectiveness on a wide range of vegetation, the potential environmental impacts, and safety for residents.

 

The chemicals chosen have low residual impact, low leaching probability, low incidence of drift off application site and high levels of effectiveness against our target weed species. If you would like to discuss chemical control in-depth, please contact the Agricultural Fieldman.

 

Big Lakes County has a rotational schedule in which chemical control is applied. For control of brush and thistle, we have split the County into three sectors. Within its rotational year, the entire sector is sprayed. In the following years, these areas are monitored for noxious and prohibited noxious weed occurrence. If found, these plants are controlled through a spot spray application. This helps minimize the amount of chemical being used.

All rented land Spray Exemption forms must be signed by the landowner, not the renter.

 

Big Lakes County has a Spray Exemption Program for those wishing to limit or eliminate chemical control adjacent to their property. Landowners are invited to participate if they would prefer to control the vegetation in the ditches surrounding their land. This control must be completed by July 15th of each year.

 

Once a landowner has signed their property into the Spray Exemption program, they will be issued “DO NOT SPRAY” signs. These signs must be placed in an area that is and will remain visible.

 

Existing agreements roll over into the next year. Enrollment for new plots of land are due on the first Monday of May annually.

 

After July 15th, the County will inspect the land to ensure the vegetation has been controlled. If control has not been performed, Big Lakes County has a legal responsibility to ensure control is achieved. We encourage landowners to work with us. If you are a Spray Exemption Program Participant who has not been able to control the vegetation enrolled in the program, call the Agricultural Services Department for assistance.

 
Prevent Skunk Issues

Big Lakes County has two skunk traps available to rent. $10 per day with a damage deposit of $50.

Agricultural Services can advise on how to prevent issues with skunks on your property. Some of these methods are related to exclusion, removing food sources and live trapping. Skunk traps are sold at many hardware stores and feed stores.

 
Wild Boar

Wild boar at large are a pest under Alberta’s Agricultural Pests Act. If a wild boar is at large or there is evidence of a wild boar at large, please contact Alberta AG 310-FARM, Big Lakes County, or email [email protected].

 
Rats

If rats are spotted in Alberta, please contact Alberta AG at 310-FARM, Big Lakes County or email [email protected].

Big Lakes County Agriculture Services is committed to providing outreach and learning opportunities to our ratepayers. When a workshop is needed to deliver new information, connect with producers or launch new programs, Agriculture Services will provide these services. Through our partnerships with extension organizations or on a County driven priority, Big Lakes County aims to meet the need of continued education in the Agricultural Sector. If there is a topic you would like covered through a workshop, please contact Agricultural Services

Big Lakes County controls beaver dams that threaten the integrity of municipal infrastructure. This includes culverts, roads, and licensed drainage ditches. If the dam affecting municipal property is on privately held land, the municipality requires a release form be signed, prior to dam removal proceeding. Please Contact Dan Bloomfield, Transportation Manager at 780-523-5955 Ext. 2353.

 

Should beaver dams be causing ponding issues on private land that does not affect municipal infrastructure, landowners would need to seek the services of a beaver control professional at their own cost.

Big Lakes County recognizes the need to support wolf population control efforts to reduce the incidents of livestock predation. To that end, the County created the Wolf Hunting Incentive. This incentive sees individuals harvesting a wolf being compensated by the municipality $250.00 per pelt(subject to change as per budget deliberations). This incentive is meant to promote the lawful hunting of wolves within the municipality.

 

The program is reviewed on a regular basis and includes all lands and residents within Big Lakes County, including the residents of Métis and First Nation settlements.

 

When requesting authorization for reward payment, the registrant must declare the following:

  1. That the wolf was harvested within an 8 kilometre (5 mile) perimeter of private property or grazing leases
  2. The legal land location where the wolf was harvested
  3. That they are the registered legal landowner or the authorized occupant of the land; and/or
  4. That the registrant has permission to hunt on said land

 

On a random basis, Agricultural Services will request confirmation of harvest site. To ease this requirement, Agricultural Services is instructing all participants to take a photo of the harvest site for our records with geolocating turned on in their smartphone. See the following instructions on how to turn on geolocating on your phone.

 
iPhone
  • How to turn on / off GPS geotagging on iPhone and iPad
  • Open iOS Settings App
  • Tap on Privacy
  • Select Location Services
  • Tap on Camera
  • In Allow location access select “While using the App” if you want photos to be geotagged or select “Never” if you don’t want photos to be geotagged.
 
Android
  • Go to your Android device’s home screen, then press the “Menu” button. Tap “Settings” to access the settings menu.
  • Drag your finger up the screen to scroll down the phone’s menu until you find the
  • “Location” option. Tap the “Location” option to continue. Note that on some Android devices this may be labeled “Location and Security.”
  • Tap the option labeled “Use GPS Satellites” to place a green check mark next to it. This option must be turned on for the geotagging option to work
  • Press the “Home” button to go back to the main screen, then tap the camera icon to launch your Android smartphone’s camera.
  • Tap the “Menu” button once the camera application loads, then tap the “Settings” option. On some Android cameras, this option will simply be a small cog icon.
  • Scroll down to “Store Location in Pictures,” or “Geo-tag Photos,” depending on your OS version, and tap that option to put a green check mark next to it. Tap “OK” when you see a message telling you that the GPS function needs to be turned on. Your photos will now be geotagged with your location as long as your phone can get your position from the GPS satellites.

In 2018, Big Lakes County began offering a Municipal Shelterbelt Program to our ratepayers. Shelterbelts help block wind from yards, offer privacy screens and can provide snow drift control in winter months.

Since that time, ratepayers have planted thousands of seedlings and calls for the start of the program come earlier every year. The Agricultural Advisory Committee is proud to have brought this program to Big Lakes County residents and hopes the program is continued for many years to come.

If you would like assistance with siting a shelterbelt, spacing recommendations, species distribution and species selection, please contact Agricultural Services.

This year, the County has the following shelterbelt seedlings for sale:
• Lodgepole Pine
• Colorado Spruce
• White Spruce
• Hybrid Spruce
• Tamarack/Siberian Larch
• Manitoba Maple
• American Elm
• Golden Willow
• Blueberry
• Little Leaf Linden, and
• Amur Maple

• Lilac

Download an order form and contact the County office at 780 523 5955.

Shelterbelt Order Form

2022 Shelterbelt Species Quick Facts

ALUS Canada is proud to be a community-developed, farmer-delivered program. With an ever-expanding number of ALUS chapters across the nation, ALUS forms a mosaic of strong and unique programs, each one determining its own priorities while upholding a shared set of national principles.

 
Alberta Environmental Farm Plan

The Environmental Farm Plan (EFP) is a voluntary, whole farm, self-assessment tool that helps producers identify their environmental risks and develop plans to mitigate identified risks. We are working together with farmers committed to environmental stewardship.

Completing an EFP allows access to Federal and Provincial grant programs.

Learn More.

 
Facts About Farming
  • 98% of Canadian farms are family-owned
  • Total land area in Alberta is 157,710,720 acres
  • Total area of farmed land in is 50,498,834 acres
  • Alberta is the largest beef producing province
  • Alberta has the 2nd most farm land of all provinces
  • Alberta has the 2nd most producers of all provinces

For more information contact our Agricultural Fieldman.

This program was initiated to ensure rural acreage owners have access to select commercial-class herbicides to control prohibited noxious and noxious weeds as identified in the Weed Control Act.

Why a specific program

In June of 2020, Big Lakes County became a participating municipality to assist producers in accessing appropriate chemical controls for their weed issues. After successfully completing the Acreage Owner Pesticide Course through Lakeland College, Rural Acreage Owners will be able to:

  • Manage their property to prevent noxious and prohibited noxious weeds from growing.
  • Manage these regulated weeds growing on their acreage using an integrated weed management approach.
  • Safely and effectively use select commercial class herbicides provided on a cost recovery basis by their municipal agricultural fieldman.
Did you know?

Alberta’s Weed Control Act requires municipalities to identify more than 75 noxious and prohibited noxious weeds. Prohibited noxious weeds must be destroyed. Noxious weeds need to be controlled.

A weed inspector, often the agricultural fieldman, surveys their municipality to see if there are outbreaks of a particular weed. If a noxious weed or a prohibited noxious weed is found on someone’s property, they are notified.

In the past, acreage owners had only 3 options to deal with these weeds:

  • Use a domestic class herbicide from a garden centre you apply yourself.
  • Use one of a few commercial class herbicides. These are the same product as domestic class, but in larger containers you buy from a commercial pesticide seller. These herbicides are for specific weed control in turf, non-cropland areas, shelterbelts and shrub beds.
  • Hire a custom pesticide service to apply herbicides for you.

The acreage owner program is another option. You work with your municipality to control problem weeds.

How to qualify for this program

This process can be initiated by Big Lakes County Agricultural Services or by an interested Ratepayer.

An inspection is performed on the land(s) in question to determine level of infestation and amount of chemical required. A prescription for the infestation will be completed and recorded in the application by the Agricultural Fieldman and/or Assistant Agricultural Fieldman.

 

The “Rural Acreage Owner” Program application is completed, and the ratepayer is directed to enroll in the Alberta Commercial Pesticide Applicator Certification Program offered by Lakeland College. The cost of the course is $75.00.

 

Upon successful completion of the course, the certificate is presented to the Agricultural Service department. Agricultural Services will then provide chemical in a handheld sprayer, trailer sprayer, quad sprayer etc. as fits the situation of the ratepayer with the amount of mixed chemical required to complete control efforts.

 

Chemical costs will be charged back to the ratepayer on a cost recovery basis.

Upon completion of control efforts, the infestation will then be re-inspected to ensure control has been achieved. This will be recorded on the application form.

If you’re looking for hay, farm equipment, livestock, land/pasture for lease or rent, then check out the online marketplace. Register for announcements with [email protected].

The Council of the Big Lakes County recognizes that Aphanomyces of Peas is a concern to agricultural operations within the municipality. Council further recognizes that it is beneficial to the County to establish measures to prevent and/or control Aphanomyces of Peas.

Prevention

Agricultural Services staff shall

  1. Encourage all seed and feed grains transported into the Big Lakes County from outside the municipal boundaries be tested for the presence of Aphanomyces and seed be treated with a fungicide registered for control of Aphanomyces;
  2. Ensure current Aphanomyces awareness resource material is available to the public;
  3. The County will continue to educate the public on Aphanomyces and encourage producer compliance with any and all provincial Aphanomyces Management Plan;
  4. In the event of disease detection, provide additional producer awareness extension activities (informational meetings / workshops, with displays, publications and/or specialist speakers).

 

Surveillance
  1. Upon the recommendation of the Agricultural Fieldman, Council shall appoint individuals to
    serve as “inspectors” for the purposes of this policy and as stipulated in Big Lakes County
    Bylaw 10-2021
  2. The Agricultural Fieldman shall schedule annual inspection of Pea fields within the
    County.
  3. The Agricultural Fieldman shall establish biosecurity protocols to be followed by inspectors while conducting inspections. Protocols shall be designed to minimize disease transferal between fields by inspectors and shall follow current Best Management Practices for the detection of Aphanomyces.
  4. Positive field totals shall be recorded and reported to the township level to Pulse Growers of Alberta, Alberta Agriculture and Forestry and the public through public meetings and map generation.

 

Control
  1. Positive Fields
    1. The owner of lands lab-confirmed positive for Aphanomyces shall be encouraged to adopt the current best management practices for the control of Aphanomyces and outlined by Pulse Growers of Alberta.
    2. Should the producer refuse to follow these guidelines voluntarily, a Notice to Remedy for the infested land, including a destruction of crop order as per Control 3(c), may be issued by Big Lakes County Council as per the Big Lakes County Bylaw 10-2021.
    3. If a producer fails to abide by the Notice to Remedy, the Agricultural Fieldman may, upon resolution of Council:
      1. Destroy the planted crop through chemical means, to prevent soil disturbance and movement, if the producer does not do so themselves.
      2. Should the municipality destroy the crop, an invoice shall be issued to the producer for the labour, chemical and equipment costs of the crop’s destruction.
  2. After the period of restriction has expired, peas may be seeded, the land(s) in question will be sampled with each planting of peas indefinitely. Should levels be detected, a new Notice to Remedy may be issued.

 

ASB Policy No. 18 shall be reviewed annually to ensure it reflects the latest scientific advancements and knowledge regarding the Aphanomyces pathogen.

Big Lakes recognizes that Fusarium graminearum (Fg) and the negative impact the disease may have on agricultural producers. Council further recognizes that it is beneficial to the municipality to establish measures to prevent and control Fg.

 

Prevention

Agricultural Services staff shall

  1. Encourage all seed and feed grains transported into the Big Lakes County from outside the municipal boundaries be tested for the presence of Fg and seed be treated with a fungicide registered for control of Fg;
  2. Ensure current Fg awareness resource material is available to the public;
  3. The County will continue to educate the public on Fg and encourage producer compliance with any and all provincial Fg Management Plan;
  4. In the event of disease detection, provide additional producer awareness extension activities (informational meetings/workshops, with displays, publications and/or specialist speakers).

 

Surveillance
  1. Upon the recommendation of the Agricultural Fieldman, Council shall appoint individuals to serve as “inspectors” for the purposes of this policy, annual inspection and as stipulated in Big Lakes County Bylaw 10-2021
  2. The Agricultural Fieldman shall establish biosecurity protocols to be followed by inspectors while conducting inspections. Protocols shall be designed to minimize disease transferal between fields by inspectors and shall follow current Best Management Practices for the detection of Fg.
  3. Positive field totals shall be recorded and reported to the township level through the public meetings and generation of a map, to Alberta Wheat, Alberta Barley and Alberta Agriculture and Forestry on an annual basis.

 

Control

In keeping with the Peace Regional ASB 2.2 Fusarium:

  1. Landowners adjacent to Fg infected croplands shall be contacted and informed that Fg has been detected;
  2. The seed source of an infested property shall be traced, and any other suspect fields shall be inspected;
  3. Upon harvest, the entire crop shall be quarantined for export outside of the Peace region. The crop shall not be utilized locally for any purposes;
  4. During transport from infected lands, all loads containing seed shall be securely covered (tarped);
  5. Crop residue and soil shall be removed from all equipment and implements before relocation from the infested lands;
  6. Infected straw shall be uniformly spread and incorporated during the harvest operation, or baled and burned on the property where the disease is detected;
  7. Crop residue shall be incorporated during the fall unless soil erosion is a concern;
  8. A non-host crop shall be seeded and/or fallow operations performed on land where Fg is detected, for a minimum of 2 consecutive years from initial infestation
  9.  After the period of restriction has expired, cereals may be seeded. the land(s) in question will be sampled with each planting of cereals indefinitely. Should levels be detected, a new Notice to Remedy may be issued.
  10. Producers with a positive Fg DNA test followed by a positive Fg plate test conducted through accredited lab analysis shall be issued a notice to remedy, in keeping with Big Lakes County Bylaw 10-2021. if a producer fails to abide by the Notice to Remedy, the Agricultural Fieldman may, upon resolution of Council:
    1. Destroy the planted crop through chemical means, if the producer does not do so themselves
    2. Should the municipality destroy the crop, an invoice shall be issued to the producer for the labour, chemical and equipment costs of the crop’s destruction

 

ABS Policy No. 19 shall be reviewed annually to ensure it reflects the latest scientific advancements and knowledge regarding the Fg pathogen.

The Council of the Big Lakes County recognizes that Verticillium Wilt of Canola is a concern to agricultural operations within the municipality. Council further recognizes that it is beneficial to the County to establish measures to prevent and/or control Verticillium Wilt of Canola.

 

Prevention

Agricultural Services staff shall

  1. Ensure current verticillium wilt awareness resource material is available to the
    public:
  2. The County will continue to educate the public on Verticillium Wilt and encourage producer compliance with any and all provincial verticillium wilt management plan(s);
  3. In the event of disease detection, provide additional producer awareness extension activities (informational meetings / workshops, with displays, publications and/or specialist speakers).

 

Surveillance
  1. Upon the recommendation of the Agricultural Fieldman, Council shall appoint individuals to
    serve as “inspectors” for the purposes of this policy and as stipulated in Big Lakes County
    Bylaw 10-2021
  2. The Agricultural Fieldman shall schedule annual inspection of Canola fields within the County.
  3. The Agricultural Fieldman shall establish biosecurity protocols to be followed by inspectors while conducting inspections. Protocols shall be designed to minimize disease transferal between fields by inspectors and shall follow current Best Management Practices for the detection of verticillium wilt as set out by University of Alberta protocols.

 

Control
  1. Positive Fields
    1. The owner of lands lab-confirmed positive for verticillium wilt shall be encouraged to adopt the current best management practices for the control of verticillium wilf and follow a 1-3 rotation.
    2. Should the producer refuse to follow these guidelines voluntarily, a Notice to Remedy for the infested land, including a destruction of crop order as per Control 3(c), may be issued by Big Lakes County Council as per the Big Lakes County Bylaw 10-2021.
  2. lf a producer fails to abide by the Notice to Remedy, the Agricultural Fieldman may, upon resolution of Council:
    1. Destroy the planted crop through chemical means, to prevent soil disturbance and movement, if the producer does not do so themselves.
    2. Should the municipality destroy the crop, an invoice shall be issued to the produceror the labour, chemical and equipment costs of the crop’s destruction.
  3. After the period of restriction has expired, canola may be seeded. The land(s) in question will be sampled with each planting of canola indefinitely. Should verticillium wilt be detected, a new Notice to Remedy may be issued.

 

ASB Policy No. 20 shall be reviewed annually to ensure it reflects the latest scientific advancements and knowledge regarding the verticillium wilt pathogen.

 

Being a bylaw of Big Lakes County, in the Province of Alberta, for protecting the agricultural productivity of lands within Big Lakes County.

WHEREAS, the Municipal Government Act Chapter M-26 as stated, in Part 2, Section 7 states that the Council of a municipality may make bylaws for the safety, health and welfare of people and the protection of people and property;

WHEREAS, the Agricultural Pests Act and Weed Control Act of Alberta list specific concerns whose presence threatens the economic well-being and viability of the agricultural producers in Big Lakes County;

WHEREAS, Big Lakes County has deemed it expedient and in the public interest to ensure that pests, diseases, insects, invasive plants or other organisms within the municipality not listed under the Agricultural Pests Act, Weed Control Act or their regulations are not allowed to establish or spread and do not impact the economic viability of our agricultural producers;

Now therefore, hereby enact as follows:

1.0 Definitions
  1. “Invasive species” means any organism not listed as Pests or Nuisances under the Agricultural Pests Act, Pest and Nuisance Regulation or Prohibited Noxious or Noxious weeds under the Weed Control Act, Weed
    Control Regulation that in the opinion of council could adversely impact the agricultural productivity of land or livestock including the quality and marketability of crops or livestock;
  2. “Inspector” means the Agricultural Fieldman appointed by Big Lakes County or such other person(s) appointed as the inspector of fields by Big Lakes County to administer and enforce this Bylaw;
  3. “Livestock” includes cattle, sheep, diversified livestock animals within the meaning of the Livestock Industry Diversification Act, goats and other captive ruminants, swine, horses and poultry.
  4. “Municipality or County” means Big Lakes County or the area contained within the boundary thereof as the context requires;
  5. “Municipal Government Act or MGA” means the Municipal Government Act of Alberta, Revised Statutes of Alberta Chapter M-26, the most current edition
  6. “Council” means the council presiding for Big Lakes County;
  7. “Owner” means a Person who controls the property under consideration, holds themselves out as the person having the powers and authority of ownership or who at the relevant time exercises the powers and authority of ownership, and includes:
    1. The Person registered on title at the Land Titles Office;
    2. A Person who is recorded as the owner of the property on the assessment roll of Big Lakes County;
    3. A Person who has purchased or otherwise acquired the property and has not become the registered owner thereof; and
    4. A Person who is the occupant of the property under a lease, license, permit or other agreement;
  8. “Property” includes any lands, buildings or structures, whether or not affixed to land;
  9. “Person” includes an individual, a firm, partnership, joint venture, proprietorship, corporation, association, society or any other legal entity;
  10. “Retailer” means any person or company who promotes, cleans or offers for sale or any service related to seed, plants or plant parts, livestock, soil or soil amendments or any other organism to an Owner that could adversely impact agriculture in Big Lakes County
2.0 Authority of Inspectors

Within the boundaries of Big Lakes County, the Inspector’s powers will include:

  1. The right to enter onto any Property at any reasonable time to inspect and seek to identify the presence of any agricultural Invasive species to determine the level of severity and whether further action is required;
    1. The inspector shall not enter a private dwelling for inspection unless consent is granted by the Owner or written notice is given;
    2. The inspector may be accompanied by a Peace Officer;
  2. To survey for or collect samples of seeds, plants or other substances or items from any Property and test or send such samples for testing to verify or determine the presence of any Invasive species;
  3. Call upon the County’s designated officer for the purpose of issuing an order to remedy contraventions pursuant to section 545 of the Municipal Government Act, for the purpose of remedying any breach of this Bylaw and eliminating the presence of any Invasive species and;
  4. To take such other reasonable steps as may be required to uncover and identify the presence of and to prevent the sale or importation of any Invasive species at any Retailer within Big Lakes County.
3.0 Obstruction

No Person, whether or not he is the Owner or Retailer which is the subject of any inspection or action under this Bylaw, shall interfere with or attempt to obstruct an Inspector who is attempting to inspect, identify, destroy or take possession of any Invasive species or otherwise carrying out any duty under this Bylaw.

Offences & Penalties

An Inspector who discovers any Invasive species within the Big Lakes County may require that steps be taken as outlined in the Big Lakes County’s Policies. Such steps to be taken will be directed in an “Order to remedy contraventions” per Section 545 of the MGA.

Any Person or Owner who contravenes any provision of this Bylaw is also guilty of an offence and may be liable to a specified penalty in the form of a Violation Ticket of $500.00

Where an inspector reasonably believes that a Person has contravened any provision of this Bylaw, they may use the County’s designated officer to serve a Violation Tag as provided by this section, or if the delivery of the directions of Council to a Person is required, delivery shall be deemed effected if:

  1. delivery is made personally on the Person or by leaving it for the Person at his/her residence with a person on the premises who appears to be at least eighteen years of age;
  2. delivered in a manner by which the Person must affix his signature accepting delivery of the item;
  3. posted on the land and sent by regular mail, email or fax, such delivery shall be deemed completed after 7 days.

Delivery of documents may also be considered effected if done in accordance with Section 608 of the MGA “Sending documents”.

A Violation Tag shall be in such form as determined by Big Lakes County
and shall state the section of the Bylaw which was contravened.

If the actions specified on a Violation Tag is not taken within the prescribed time period, then a peace officer is hereby authorized and empowered to issue a Violation Ticket pursuant to the Provincial Offences Procedure Act, RSA 2000, c. P-34, as amended.

A Person who has been issued a Violation Tag in respect of a contravention of a provision of this Bylaw and has carried out the actions as indicated by Big Lakes County within the time allowed, shall not be liable to prosecution for the subject contravention.

The levying and payment of any fine or the imprisonment for any period provided in this Bylaw shall not relieve a person from the necessity of payment of any fees, charges or costs for which he is liable under the provisions of this Bylaw or the Municipal Government Act, R.S.A. 2000, c. M-26.

A Person who feels aggrieved by this Bylaw or actions taken by an Inspector under this Bylaw may request a review by council per Section 547 of the MGA.

5.0 Severability

5.1 Should any section or part of this Bylaw be found to have been improperly enacted, for any reason, then such section or part shall be regarded as being severable from the rest of the Bylaw and the Bylaw remaining after such severance shall be effective and enforceable as if the section found to be improperly enacted had not been enacted as part of this Bylaw.

6.0 Effective Date

This bylaw shall have force and take effect upon third and final reading.

Read a first time this 9 day of June, 2021

Read a second time this 9″ day of June, 2021

Unanimous consent was provide to proceed to third reading this 9th day of June, 2021

Read a third time this 9th day of June, 2021